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Aviation Sales – Discussion – How to Approach New Prospects

How to approach new prospects?

It’s easy and fun to work with people who already know, like, and trust you.

Approaching someone that’s never heard of you is a different story.   And yet to expand our markets, we all need to do it!

We want to make a good first impression and open the door to future business, without wasting a lot of our time of theirs until we learn more about each other. But in these suspicious times, especially without the benefit of in-person events, how do you do it effectively?

John, Mickey and I share anxieties, frustrations and strategies.

 

 

Transcript – How to to Approach New Prospects

 

Mickey Gamonal:

Cool. Well, let’s get started. All right. My name is Mickey Gamonal. I am the owner of Gamonal Tutors. Currently, we do ASVAB domination. If you or anyone you know is going into the military needs help crushing the ASVAB and even if you just want to talk about how the military works, something like that, I’m happy to help. Look me up under Gamonal Tutors on all of your social medias.

Paula Williams:

Great. Are you doing things besides the ASVAB nowadays or just that?

Mickey Gamonal:

I’m taking some side hustles. Like a couple of clients in Vegas, I’ll do a couple of hourly things, but yeah, it’s all ASVAB right now.

Paula Williams:

Cool.

Mickey Gamonal:

In the next three to six months, I’d like to expand to a couple other standardized tests.

Paula Williams:

Cool.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

Fantastic. Paula Williams, ABCI. We help aviation companies sell more of their products and services. We have sales training for aviation sales professional. We got marketing modules. Now we’re working toward doing individual done with you courses, like the one that we’re launching in November. It’s going to be about social media, so look for more information about that and the done for you are great. The done with you and the do it yourself is a three options. What people have been telling us is that they want more of the done with you. It’s a collaboration and saved them money, and also gets more of their personality and motives and everything else and style into the final product. Done with you works better.

Mickey Gamonal:

Absolutely. That’s great.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

John Williams:

Now what she said? I’m John Williams, and I do the backend stuff for the company, and I help the sales on Cape.

Mickey Gamonal:

Cool. Today, we are talking about approaches. Approaches can be difficult, particularly lately with technology and in-person approaches. Approach is a pretty vague term, but to approach something is to get closer to it. If you’re going to sell products or services, you’re definitely going to be doing some form of approach somewhere along the line. Do you guys want to just share your general experience with approaches, and maybe some of the most common sticking points that you’ve seen?

Paula Williams:

I have to say approaches are like my biggest fear about marketing. That’s the thing that I fear the most is approaching somebody for the first time that doesn’t know me and I don’t know them. I think part of that is just you’re always more comfortable with people that know you. If I could just sell to people I know all day long, that would be fine and just talk to people I know all day long, that would be fine, but there’s a discomfort that comes with the brick wall I think of I don’t know you, I don’t like you, I don’t trust you, you’re a salesperson, the whole defenses that everybody throws in your way if you are approaching them in a traditional kind of a sale sort of way. That’s why I hate doing phone calls first.

Paula Williams:

I like to do combinations, but I’ve got a bunch of combinations we can talk about today that worked in different circumstances.

John Williams:

The thing is phones haven’t changed in years of how you do it. I mean, you got a hand call now that sets you dial a number-

Paula Williams:

Right.

John Williams:

… and what’s different between…

Paula Williams:

People actually talk on these things?

John Williams:

Yeah, right, but I mean, seriously, I mean, what’s the difference in a phone call versus walking up to somebody on the street and shaking hands and say, “Hey, my name is, and I noticed you’re doing blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and I think maybe I can help you with that.” You say, “Really, how would that be?” “Well, you’re trying to do this, right.” “Yeah, yeah, and how are you going about that?” They tell you, they say, “Well, I’ve got this product here that would do this for you and help you in that endeavor.”

Mickey Gamonal:

Cool.

John Williams:

What’s the difference of doing that on a phone versus doing on some guy? See, I’ve been to lots of sales training courses and one of them, I won’t name the company, but it was in Los Angeles, and we got done on the second week. They said, “Now, when you walk out the door, you pick up a stone off the sidewalk, you flip it up in the air and whichever way it goes, you go that way, and you sell every person you meet,” and I did.

Paula Williams:

See, that would kill me. I would just die.

John Williams:

I followed the process, and I sold every person I met till I got to my car, and I thought, “Holy cow, that’s easy.”

Mickey Gamonal:

Wow. That’s pretty cool. It must’ve been a hell of a conference.

John Williams:

Yeah, it was actually. I quit that though, because I was selling people stuff they could… I mean, it wasn’t my call on whether they could afford or not because they dealt with the company, right? I ended up selling them and sign them up, and they go talk to somebody else and I do admire they would, but I did the sales job.

Paula Williams:

The setting appointment with them.

John Williams:

Set the appointment with the guy to take the check, take the cash, and get their signature.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

John Williams:

That was the easiest sales approach I had ever in my life tried, and I’ve sold everything from seeds for a garden when I was young to cars.

Paula Williams:

You did that door to door, the seeds, right?

John Williams:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

Just knock on somebody’s door with your little basket of seeds and…

John Williams:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

How old were you?

John Williams:

I didn’t do basket of seeds. I had a piece of paper to show them what I could sell them.

Paula Williams:

Oh, wow. The girl scout cookie approach.

John Williams:

Yup.

Paula Williams:

Wow.

Mickey Gamonal:

How old were you when you did that?

John Williams:

Well, I must’ve been 12, maybe 13-

Mickey Gamonal:

Geez.

John Williams:

… and then after that, we moved to New Orleans and then I got into Junior Achievement, and that’s all about sales.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

John Williams:

Then from there, it was different sales courses. I mean, Pacific Institute. I don’t know, I don’t remember them all, but if there’s a sales course out there, I’ve probably been to it.

Mickey Gamonal:

Wow.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

John Williams:

Anyway, I hear what you say about the thumb. I don’t believe it.

Paula Williams:

Okay. Oh, another horrible job I had was selling discover cards at the mall. I was in high school and basically, you just chase people down with your clipboard in the mall and say, “Hi there, do you have a discover card? Would you like a discover card? Let me sign you up for a discover card.” You fill out the application with them standing there, you ask some questions and things. Then you turn in the forms, and you would get some amount of money performed that you turned in that was complete. That was a stinky, horrible job, turned me off from sales forever, at least that kind of thing. I’m trying to give them away something for free, and they don’t want it, so that was…

John Williams:

Well, there you go. See, something for free, the value is gone before you even started.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah. No, it’s tough. I mean, I think it’s really easy to be turned off of sales. I mean definitely, I’ve been there many times where I think to myself like, “Geez, this sucks.” I’m trying to convince these guys to buy something, and it’s really insidious, right? It gets under your skin because the second that I’m called a scammer, I revile, right? It completely freaks me out that somebody would even think that I’m trying to do something that’s unethical, and that’s the climate, right? Nine times out of 10, if somebody says, “Hey, I want you to buy something,” the first thing they’re going to think is you’re trying to scam me-

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

… and they’ve built up that defense over years and years and years. I think one of the biggest things with approaches is it has to be natural, which is tough because at the end of the day, you are trying to make a sale, right?

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

How do you differentiate that? How do you make those things coming…

John Williams:

First, you have to talk to them about help. I mean, because if you’re not going to help them, then they’re right to say no.

Mickey Gamonal:

That’s true.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

John Williams:

If you’re going to help them and you can say, “Well, my intent is to help you, or worse that effect,” and then, “Well, how are you going to do that?”

Paula Williams:

Right.

John Williams:

You go, “Well, here’s how I would go about it, or you’re trying to do this and you’re getting nowhere fast. Is that true?” “Well, yeah.” “Then here’s the approach I would take to help you.” Yeah, it’s going to cost you some money because you’re going to have to pay for my time, but I’m willing to put in the time it takes to make sure you succeed.”

Paula Williams:

Right.

John Williams:

It went with that, or whether you’re selling us stuff for us or whatever.

Paula Williams:

Yeah, yeah. That’s true. One thing that I’ve found that works really well is if your first approach to someone is not a sales question or a sales activity. I really like to do combinations and the Gary Vaynerchuk, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook is all about combinations. The oldest combination in the book, the super old school combination is basically a direct mail followed by a phone call. Basically, you send them a package in the mail or a postcard or something like that saying, “I can help you basically the same thing, or I can provide you with a report about this or that, or the other thing, or I can give you something that you want in exchange for 30 minutes of your time or 60 minutes of your time, or dinner at your favorite restaurant or whatever,” and that’s super old school.

Paula Williams:

That’s been around since the beginning of time. John, you’ve probably seen that one from way back, or at least heard of it.

John Williams:

Yeah. I’m not seeing this one, but it’s the most successful sales letter ever was the American Express letter.

Paula Williams:

Yeah, and that’s great if you’ve got a fantastic piece of copy. That one was about there were two boys that went to the same school, and they parted ways in 20 years later, one of them successful and one of them is not. The implication is that one is managing his money in a smart way and using the American Express card and so on. That one is using the principles that you talked about, this is how we can help you, this is something that you care about, and this is something that we enough about you to have made these assumptions.

John Williams:

Next the approach to help is valid no matter what you’re selling, but your time, whether it’s a set of tires for an aircraft. Some of the stuff can be commoditized, but you can add value as saying, “Well, yeah, I’m going to tell you what. If you buy this, we’ll absorb the shipping costs, and you can add some things in to make that even better.” Same thing with any part product or service.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Go ahead.

Mickey Gamonal:

That’s tough beause I hear you, what you guys are saying about the direct mail letters and stuff like that, but that’s not technically an approach, right? You hit them with the direct mail. Hopefully, they see it, and then you go and follow up with a phone call. The phone call, those constitute an approach because that’s a direct interaction, right?

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

I like the emphasis on coming from a place of help. I feel like that is something that I’ve definitely overlooked, right? Because when I’m reaching out to a student, I already know they need the help, right? We both already know that they need help, but I think not…

John Williams:

You need to state it.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah, it needs to be stated. I think you’re right. I think that’s something that I’ve been forgetting to do and neglecting with my clients is saying, “Look, my intent is to help you to succeed.”

Paula Williams:

Yeah, and I think with anyone, you get into your mode of you know what you do and you are very good at it, and any of our clients are in the same boat. They do this all day long every day. They know how much the other person needs it, but the other person, this is not their whole life. The ASVAB is just a very tiny part of they got to get their car fixed and they got to do this, and dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. Entering from the space of I can help you with the ASVAB, you’re assuming that they know that they need help with ASVAB.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

One thing we did really, really badly early on in our career was one of the products that we offered was website rehabs. We would approach people with terrible websites, and we would assume that they knew that their website was terrible, and we would assume that they didn’t need to be told how terrible it was, or if they did that they would think it’s important enough to fix. Those are two big assumptions that were completely incorrect. Most of the people didn’t care about their website. They had 47 things to worry about today, and their website was not one of them. That was not successful at all because we weren’t acting from a position of need or a position of helping with what they really needed, or what they really wanted.

Mickey Gamonal:

That’s a good point. That’s a really good point. Yeah. I mean, I always ask my students, what was your most recent score, or what are you struggling with most in the ASVAB, but that still doesn’t address that I’m trying to help them, right? I neglect that all the time.

Paula Williams:

Right. They might think their score is fine, but they don’t know. You have to score X, Y, or Z to get at MLS that they want.

Mickey Gamonal:

Well, even if they know that their score is low, and most of them do know that their score is low, I still don’t say, “All right, let’s try to make that… Like, I am here to make that better.” I really need to drive that home a little bit more seriously because at the end of the day, that is the objective. That’s the whole freaking point, to gloss over that because I’m going to be saying it for the next month. If they sign up, I’m going to say it every single lesson. I don’t think that it’s something that needs to be said in the beginning, because I’m just sick of saying like, “We’re trying to boost these scores, we’re trying to boost these scores. Let’s stay focused. Let’s stay [crosstalk 00:16:05].

John Williams:

Yeah. When somebody calls you or signs up, then you have to call them. I mean you have to talk to them sometime, right?

Mickey Gamonal:

Absolutely. Yeah.

John Williams:

Then I would lead with something like, “So you are interested in my help to get you a better score on the ASVAB. Is that correct?” Then what are they going to say? “No, that’s fine. I’ll do right.” They’re going to say yes.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yup. I mean their reaction is going to be like, “But how much is it?” Right? That’s when they start getting defensive if I say something saying, “You need help with the ASVAB and you want me to help you?”

John Williams:

No, you asked him. You don’t say you needed. You say, “So you called me, and so does that mean you want my help in getting a better ASVAB score?” They say, “Yes, but I don’t know how much it costs.” Then you say, “Well, okay, what would it be worth to-

Paula Williams:

Get to that, right?

John Williams:

… change your career from an infantry person to that of a high tech school, whatever?” You know what I mean?

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah. It’s funny because I’ve heard these things before. We read Chris Voss’s Never Split the Difference, and we’ve talked about these things a million times. Dan Kennedy, everybody says something very similar, but yeah, it’s a certain level of practice before you really start to listen.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

It always feels like I’m hearing it, even though it sounds the exact freaking same. It sounds [crosstalk 00:17:41].

Paula Williams:

Yeah, I know all this, but yeah, but do you do it is the question. In our classes, we do role playing of approaches and things like that. Even when they know here’s the checklist, here are the things you’ve got to accomplish in the next five minutes, people revert to what they have done in the past, and they don’t ask the question. They don’t close the compartment. They don’t get the yes before they continue. Even in our sales courses where everybody knows, and they just saw a video like five minutes ago, this is what you’re going to be doing and they still can’t do it, because they just revert to what’s comfortable for them which…

John Williams:

It’s not that they can’t do it, it’s they don’t do it.

Paula Williams:

Right, right. It takes them practice is what I’m saying to get comfortable doing at things that…

John Williams:

Well, and the way to get comfortable is to assume that the person you’re talking to wants to be your friend, and then you approach them the same way.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

That’s a great way.

Paula Williams:

I like the big dog mindset. Mickey, when you were little, you had a big dog, and this dog would not take crap from you. I mean, when you were a baby and you pulled his ears or whatever, and stuff like that, he’d just get up and walk away. Then he’d be right back because he loved you and everything, but still, he wouldn’t take crap from you because he was big enough to just get up, shake you up, and walk away. He wasn’t going to get cranky. He wasn’t going to growl. He wasn’t going to snarl. He wasn’t going to do anything because he’s a big dog and you’re a little kid. If you approach your prospect, and sometimes even I have a picture of a big dog of mine in my office. I like to get into the mindset of the big dog.

Paula Williams:

I’m the big dog, this is the little kid that needs help, affection, trust, everything else and so forth and so on. They might pull my ears. They might stick a finger in my eye. They might do all of those things, but I’m a big dog, I can get up and walk away. That’s the mindset check that I use for approaches is, “Hi there, I’m a big friendly dog”-

Mickey Gamonal:

Nice.

Paula Williams:

… and that helps me get in the right mindset of, “I’m here to help. You may not want my help. If you don’t want my help, that’s fine. No problem. There are six other people on my list of people to call today, and that’s cool, and I might be back. I might not be, but that’s what we’re looking at.”

Mickey Gamonal:

Right.

Paula Williams:

They can smell that. If you smell like a big dog, they can tell. I mean they feel the confidence, they feel the friendliness, they feel whatever it is that you are projecting. If you go into it and I used to go into it with the, “Oh my God, I got to make calls today. I feel like crap, because this is my least favorite thing to do and I hate this,” then they’re going to feel that too, and people pick up so much even over the phone. It’s insane, but anyway.

Mickey Gamonal:

We’re social creatures, right?

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

I mean, we rely on these instincts that we get. We pick up vibes from people instantly through every single tone and every single pause. We are trying to figure out what they’re getting at. We’re trying to figure out what they’re trying to say.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah, big dog mindset. I like that.

Paula Williams:

Right, and I also never, never, never, almost never do a phone call before they know who I am. I want to make sure I’ve connected with them on LinkedIn, sent them something. Maybe they’re in a Facebook group that I’m in, or if they’re on a LinkedIn group that I’m in, I’ve commented on something that they’ve said recently. We’ve had some kind of interaction before the phone call, so this is not the first time they’ve heard of me, and that’s a vanity thing. I just like people not saying, “Who are you again?”

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

“And what do you do, and why are you calling?” If they know something, or at least we’ve been introduced. They know I’m an aviation at least, and they know I’m in marketing. Maybe they’ve read an article that I’ve written or something, or like something that I’ve written, then we’ve got the place to start. It’s not a complete out of the blue, who the hell are you kind of a scenario, right?

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah, absolutely.

John Williams:

Just remember, they got some numbers that 20% of the people that don’t have to be sold to, they just buy.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

John Williams:

Twenty percent of the people you’ll never sell to, and so your job is the other 60%.

Mickey Gamonal:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paula Williams:

Well, to be honest in our market, I have not run into that 20% that is just going to roll over and buy without being sold to. I think everybody…

John Williams:

Well, we have.

Paula Williams:

Huh?

John Williams:

Doug I think asked me, how do I buy this?

Paula Williams:

That’s true. That is true, and that sometimes happens, but not on the first contact, even with Doug.

John Williams:

I didn’t say it happened on a first contact.

Paula Williams:

Right.

John Williams:

Probably 20/60.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mickey Gamonal:

Hmm.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

I mean, yeah, I’ve had a couple of those unicorns for sure that have bought my program before. There’s just suddenly money in my account and that’s the goal, right? That’s the dream is that you create this great piece of ad copy, and then you never have to talk to anybody again. You just provide results. From that point forward, you’re not shaking trees. I think that’s one of the big sticking points with just marketing and approaches in general is that you don’t really get into business to sell it to people, right?

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

Unless your goal is just exclusively to make money, more likely than not, you want to provide something in exchange that.

Paula Williams:

Yeah, and you want to get on with the business of teaching people and getting higher scores, and making those things happen, which is why you’re doing what you’re doing.

Mickey Gamonal:

Exactly, exactly.

Paula Williams:

You want to spend less time doing sales, and that will happen, but the more complicated, the more complex the product is, the more time and money it’s going to require on the customer’s part, the less likely that is to happen. I mean, if you’re selling 99 cent music downloads, then yeah, absolutely, you’re going to have sales just happening because it’s low cost, low risk on everybody’s part. They don’t have to put any work into it. They just listened to it. They like it or they don’t. If they don’t like it, they wasted 99 cents. That’s a different kind of product than what any of our clients or what you’re selling, because you’re going to require hours of their time doing something they don’t like, right?

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

We’re going to require more money than a download, or a piece of software, or anything like that. In fact, we could build a cheat sheet or a chart. I’ve seen them about the dollar amount, and the amount of hours that you expect a customer to spend is in proportion with the amount of time you have to spend selling them, or the amount of effort you have to spend in getting that product sold. If you’re selling software to an FBO, as an example, like MotiveLMS, that’s going to take three or four consultations with different people in that company to answer their questions and figure out how this is going to fit with what they’ve already got, and talking to the right folks and making sure that it’s answering all their concerns and everything like that.

Paula Williams:

That’s going to take longer than what you do, but you still have to convince at least one person. You’re going to have to spend hours and dollars and time, and you’re going to have to do math problems with me four weeks. Not an easy sell.

Mickey Gamonal:

No, not at all, not at all. It’s tough. It’s tough to motivate people to do better at things.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

You like the idea of getting better, but it takes more than just the thought and the money.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mickey Gamonal:

It takes a significant amount of effort.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

It sounds like that’s what people are more interested in from you guys as well lately, right? You have an option where you do it all for them, or you can do it with them.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

They prefer you involved with their people, is that right?

Paula Williams:

Well, and part of that is money. Nowadays, people don’t want to be making huge investments or as you did investments as they might’ve made a year ago, simply because of the uncertainty in the market and things like that. If they can save half the money by doing it with us and putting in sweat equity and everything else. Then the other thing is just control over the project, so that it looks like them and the marketing materials are very personal and very custom. The more time and energy our client spends, the more custom and authentic it’s going to be coming from them.

Mickey Gamonal:

Cool.

Paula Williams:

Yeah. It’s not just some slick agency doing a thing and handing it to you. It’s something that’s really, really authentically your company and represents you well, and people can see this doesn’t look like every other FBO or every other light school or every other, whatever out there.

Mickey Gamonal:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paula Williams:

Yeah, but anyway, I guess my favorite thing with approaches is really combinations, and you have a combination that you taught me earlier this year that you learned from a course, and that was basically a Facebook ad leading to a challenge, leading to a private group, leading to a strategy call. It was a 4-step approach really.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah.

Paula Williams:

How did that go?

Mickey Gamonal:

I mean, it goes, well. The more you put into it, the more you’re going to get out of it, like anything. It’s a lot to maintain. I’m definitely trying to make it a little bit simpler.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

Of course, it is all automated. The beauty of it is I have people click learn more on my ad. It sends them to Facebook Messenger, where they saw the ad anyway. They stay on the same platform, and then they can start chatting with me. Then eventually they give me their email address, and this is all done by chatbots. Then as soon as I have that email address, I send them to an email sequence where they’re going to get four to six emails over the next few days, and I send them over to my free Facebook group where they can get some free help there. It just gets them to consume more of me, and then they schedule an appointment to discuss joining the paid program. It’s a lot of running around effort. There is no doubt about that.

Mickey Gamonal:

There’s a lot that went into that and like I say, I just recently changed my Facebook group. Now I got to go through and find all the emails and all of the chatbots and everything like that and change the link, so that it sends them to the right Facebook group, and now I got to re-shoot ads for the 4-day challenge. There’s a lot that goes into it, and it pays me zero. It pays me zero dollars.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

It is tough, but yeah, it is much easier to speak with a client who you know wants what you have.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

If they’re going through all of that, there’s no doubt that they’re looking for some help.

Paula Williams:

Yeah. You’re basically running them through a gauntlet before you do an approach, so you’re pretty sure that they’re qualified, they’re motivated.

John Williams:

They watch your [inaudible 00:30:08].

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

Exactly. Yeah. I mean, that’s the beauty of it, but yeah, like I say, it’s tough. I would much prefer a more streamlined process maybe with like less chatbots and simpler things. The gauntlet is good in that it presents us a motivated buyer, which is really anybody who’s selling something needs, but even for me, it feels complex.

Paula Williams:

Right.

Mickey Gamonal:

I’m the one who knows how it all works, because they have never heard of it.

Paula Williams:

Right, but once you make the changes and things like that, it will work for six months or a year before you have to change anything again, or is it something that you have to do every quarter, or how are you arranging that?

Mickey Gamonal:

I mean, I’ll probably change something every three months, but at the end of the day, there’s still enough people out there that need help with this, that I could go find… I get sales organically as well.

Paula Williams:

Yeah.

Mickey Gamonal:

I’ve had a lot more benefit from that. It’s an easier result if you are comfortable speaking to people. Especially for me now that I’m a Second Lieutenant and I’ve been through basic training, I can go into a recruiting office, and I’m not nearly as intimidated by the uniform guys as I used to be.

John Williams:

Of course not. You’re an officer and you’re not.

Mickey Gamonal:

Exactly, and they don’t even know…

Paula Williams:

Sorted them around if you wanted to.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah, they don’t even know, that’s the kicker. If I know that I came in there with rank that they would yell attention, then everybody would ask us rise as I walk in there. It’s a pretty good deal. It’s a pretty good deal to [crosstalk 00:32:05].

Paula Williams:

That’s an excellent point. If you’ve got that credibility and you can get that credibility, we talk about credibility markers in the aviation industry, like number of flight hours, whether you’ve got four stripes on your shoulders or whatever, and stuff like that. Then the military is they invented credibility markers, right?

Mickey Gamonal:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), absolutely. I mean, yeah, it’s an integral part is knowing rank and who’s next in line of chain of command and everything like that. It’s very important.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mickey Gamonal:

My name is Mickey Gamonal, ASVAB domination with Gamonal Tutors. Feel free to look me up, Gamonal Tutors on Instagram or Facebook, and we can get you into the military at the highest level.

Paula Williams:

Fantastic. Paula Williams with ABCI. Our latest project is a social media challenge, where we’re creating 90 days of social media posts with you to test against each other, and grow your market and make those approaches.

John Williams:

John Williams, one of my hands is IT here, and you can tell we had some issues early on, but I think they’ve been resolved now.

Paula Williams:

Fantastic.

Mickey Gamonal:

Great. That’s the mark of a good IT guy is if he can fix the problems. Problems come up either way.

Paula Williams:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). That’s true. Marketing, everything is marketing. All right. Talk to you guys later. Thanks.

Mickey Gamonal:

Yeah. Thanks, bye-bye.

John Williams:

See you, bye.

 

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